COURSE CATALOG

 

2021-2022 Spring Semester

Online

 

International College of UCAS


 

 

目录

COURSE CATALOG.. 1

2021-2022 Spring Semester 1

Online1

International College of UCAS1

General Introduction3

Plant Physiology and Ecology11

Nano-biology12

Molecular Entomology and Plant Pathology14

Biochemistry16

Conservation Biology18

Introduction to Epigenetics and RNA silencing26

Nanobiological Sensing and Detection30

Nanotechnology for Solar Energy Utilization Applications32

Nano Electronic Materials34

Plate Tectonics and Evolution of Tibetan Plateau35

Physical Geography39

Global Change Ecology42

Climate Change44

Chemical Reaction Engineering48

Energy Chemistry and Energy Chemical Industry51

Green Chemistry and Engineering52

Fluidization and Multiphase Flow.. 54

Applied Statistics55

Applications of Remote Sensing on Climate Change, Land Science and Severe Weather57

Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course: 60

Water Chemistry61

Fundamental for Internet of Things and Its Applications63

Biodiversity science66

Development Geography70

Integrative Systematic Biology74

 

 


 

 

General Introduction

  1. Course Selection System-for Professional Courses Only

This course selection system is for students registering courses online. Because the capacity of every course is limited and first come first select, this system will be opened during Jan. 10th –Jan. 31st, 2022 and the students from International College can register first. Please use the google chrome or 360 browsers. Do not choose two courses schedule overlap. 

Website: http://ic-course.ucas.ac.cn/

   Username: Your passport ID

   Original password: 123456

Date

Process

Jan. 11-Jan. 31

Register professional courses in Course Selection System

Feb.28

Courses start

Feb.28-Mar.11

Confirm the registration with assistant teacher of each course

Jul. 1

All the courses end

 

NOTE: The course selection system is just for collecting students’ information. It is just the first step. Only after confirming with the teaching assistant can the course be selected successfully.

  1. General Degree Requirements for Doctors

The requirement of UCAS for Doctor Degree is to get at least 9 credits before graduation. 4 credits should be from Professional Degree Courses. But students from institutes need to check out the requirements of your own institutes. Each institute has different requirement of credits. Please contact the Educational Administration of your own institutes first.

  1. General Degree Requirements for Masters

The requirement of UCAS for Masters is to get at least 30 credits before graduation. At least 13 credits should be from Professional Degree Courses. Every master student needs to take at least 2 credits from optional courses.

  1. General Degree Requirements for MD-PhD Students

The requirement of UCAS for MD-PhD students is to get at least 38 credits before graduation. 12 credits are from the Public Compulsory courses. At least 16 credits should be from Professional Degree Courses. Every student needs to take at least 2 credits from optional courses.

 

Types

Public compulsory courses

Optional courses

Professional degree courses

In total

Masters

7 credits

≥2 credits

≥12 credits

≥30 credits

PhD

7 credits

None

≥4 credits and ≥2 courses

≥9 credits

MD-PhD

13 credits

≥2 credits

≥16 credits

≥38 credits

  1. Courses Type

Courses are classified as degree courses and non-degree courses.  

5.1 Public compulsory courses (7 credits in total)Degree Courses

(1) Elementary Chinese 1 (2 credits); 

(2) Elementary Chinese 2 (2 credits); 

(3) China Panorama (2 credits). 

(4) Academic Morality and Writing Norms (1 credits). 

These four Public compulsory courses are Degree Courses for all international students. However, we have a rule about Course Waiver. Students who can meet one of the conditions can apply for course waiver and will get 6 credits directly (except Academic Morality and Writing Norms).

A. Providing a certificate of HSK Level 3;

B. Got a bachelor’s degree or master’s degree which are taught in Chinese.

Students who apply for the course waiver need to contact Ms. Season (dingdanni@ucas.ac.cnbefore the February 28th.

 

5.2 Professional coursesDegree Courses and Non-degree Courses

The professional courses can be classified as one of two types: Degree Courses and Non-degree Courses. This final decision of course classification for each student is left to the supervisor, as s/he is in the best position to assess the courses for the graduate programs. If students find the professional courses are totally not related to his/her major and will not help the research for PhD, then these courses can be seen as Non-degree Courses (Optional Courses). If the professional courses will help the research for PhD, then they should be Degree Courses (Compulsory Courses). This classification of one course will be shown on the course selection form and the final score sheet. All the students have two weeks to attend the professional classes and choose them.

 

5.3 Optional coursesNon-degree Courses

All the optional courses are non-degree courses.

  1. Rules about courses results

Students should drop out of the university under one of the following circumstances:

1Master candidates who fail two degree courses within one semester and still fail one after relearning the courses, or fail three degree courses during the school years.

2PhD candidates who fail one degree course and still fail after relearning the course, or fail two courses during their school years.

The Public compulsory courses are all Degree courses.

  1. Contact Information

Education Coordinator for Professional Courses:

  1. Phone: 010-82680563, Ms. Sophie
  2. E-mail: hutian@ucas.ac.cn

 

Education Coordinator for Public compulsory courses:

  1. Phone: 010-82680986, Ms. Season
  2. E-mail: dingdanni@ucas.ac.cn

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

20212022学年春季和夏季学期校历

年度    year

2022 春季学期 ( Spring Semester)

 

2022夏季学期

(Summer Semester)

 

月份   month

二月(Feb)

三月(Mar)

四月(Apr)

五月(May)

六月(Jun)

六月(Jun)

七月(Jul)

周次   week

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

I

(17)

II

(18)

III

(19)

IV

(20)

星期一Mon

21

28

7

14

21

28

4

11

18

25

2

9

16

23

30

6

13

20

27

4

星期二Tue

22

1

8

15

22

29

5清明节

12

19

26

3

10

17

24

31

7

14

21

28

5

星期三Wed

23

2

9

16

23

30

6

13

20

27

4

11

18

25

1

8

15

22

29

6

星期四Thu

24

3

10

17

24

31

7

14

21

28

5

12

19

26

2

9

16

23

30

7

星期五Fri

25

4

11

18

25

1

8

15

22

29

6

13

20

27

3

午节

10

17

24

1

8

星期六Sat

26

5

12

19

26

2

9

16

23

30

7

14

21

28

4

11

18

25

2

9

星期日Sun

27

6

13

20

27

3

10

17

24

1劳动节

8

15

22

29

5

12

19

26

3

10


 

 

Course title: 

Plant Physiology and Ecology

Instructor: 

Associate Prof. Laiye Qu

Course type: Lecture

Course Assessment:

None

Grading Policy:

Registration (17% of the final score)

one report (50% of the final score)

one quiz (33% of the final score)

Course Prerequisites:

None

Catalog Description:

This course will introduce the plant physiological mechanisms that underlie ecological observation under the changing environment. The course will mainly introduce some general knowledge of photosynthesis, plant water relations, mineral nutrients, growth and allocation, symbiosis associations, and plant-soil interaction. Some general research methods and some basic statistical analysis and statistical plotting also will be introduced.

Schedule of the course

No.

Objectives

Remarks

1.

General Introduction

 

2.

Plant adaption

 

3.

Photosynthesis

 

4.

Respiration

 

5.

Plant water relations

 

6.

Mineral nutrients

 

7.

Nitrogen

 

8.

Decomposition 

 

9.

Phosphorus

Report

10.

Mycorrhiza

 

11.

Multiple relationship

 

12.

Growth and allocation

 

13.

Restoration

 

14.

Succession

 

15.

Plant-soil feedback

 

16.

General discussion 

 

17

Examination

Presentation

 


 

 

Course title

Nano-biology

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Assoc. Prof. Chen Deliang & Prof. Zhang Zhuqing

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

See Schedule of the course

Course Assessment:

Each student is expected to give an oral presentation on a topic related to his/her own interest and to Nanobiology

Grading Policy:

30% assessment , 70% final exam (open book).

Course Prerequisites:

None.

Catalog Description:

Nanobiology is to understand the Biological Science in the nanometer scale. Targeting at graduate students in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Engineering with interest in Biological Science, this course not only introduces the basic concepts, principles and techniques of Nanobiology, but also presents many of the lessons that may be learned from nature and how they are being applied to nanotechnology. Participants will be guided to discuss latest discoveries and hot topics, such as manipulating single molecules and protein design in related interdisciplinary fields. 

Schedule of the course

 

Chapters

Sections

hours

1

Introduction to Nanobiology

Scope and Objects of Nanobiology; 

Historical Development of Nanobiology;

The Unfamiliar World of Nanobiology: Its Unique Properties

6

2

Structural Principles in Bio-nanomaterials

Building Block of Bio-nanomaterials; Protein Nanostructures; 

DNA Nanostructures; 

Lipid Nanostructures

12

3

Functional Principles in Bio-nanomaterials

Information-Driven Nano-assembly

Bioenergetics

Chemical Transformation

Nano-transport

10

4

Frontier Topics in Nanobiology

Protein Design

Motor Nanodevice

Bio-nanocomputers 

Bio-nanosensors

12

5

Techniques and Approaches in Nanobiology

Nano-Imaging: STED, STORM, PALM;

Nano-Manipulating: AFM, STM, OT, MT; 

Single Molecule Structure Determination: EM, X-ray diffraction;

10

total

 

 

50


Textbook and any related course material

Bionanotechnology: lessons from nature; 1st edition

David S. Goodsell,

Wiley-Liss, Inc. 2004

References will be provided in class.


 

 

Course title

Molecular Entomology and Plant Pathology

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. ZOU Zhen

Prof. LI Xiang-Dong

Prof. LIU Jun

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

3hrs/week by instructor.

Tuesday afternoons, from 13:30-16:20.

Course Assessment:

Quiz, exams, and home work

Grading Policy:

Final scores will be determined by 33.3%(LI),33.4%(ZOU), and 33.3%(LIU).

Course Prerequisites:

Without

Catalog Description:

This course will cover the basis of modern agriculture biotechnology, molecular entomology and plant pathology. In the first part, we will explain the importance of insect science and its impact on agriculture, forest, and human health. We will also discuss several important aspects of molecular entomology such as systematics, metabolism, endocrinology, reproduction, locomotors system etc. The basic knowledge of insect physiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry, which were used to study entomology, will be provided during the class. The second part of the course will give students the general view of the history and development of plant pathology. Particularly, the concepts of plant innate immunity and plant epidemiology will be introduced and emphasized, including PAMPs triggered immunity, effector triggered immunity and basal defense of plants. In addition, plant pathogen isolation and identification and plant protection will be discussed in the course. 

 

Schedule of the course

section

content

Lecturer

1

Introduction to entomology

Zhen Zou

2

DNA synthesis, transcription, and translation

Zhen Zou

3

Insect transgenesis and comparative genomics

Zhen Zou

4

Molecular Systematics and Phylogeny

Zhen Zou

5

Circulatory system, Endocrinology and Reproduction /First Exam

Zhen Zou

6

Insect Nervous Systems

Xiangdong Li

7

Insect Visual Signaling

Xiangdong Li

8

Insect Chemical Communication

Xiangdong Li

9

Insect Mechanical Communication I

Xiangdong Li

10

Insect Mechanical Communication II

Xiangdong Li

11

Insect Locomotor Systems /Second Exam

Xiangdong Li

12

Introduction to plant pathology

Jun Liu

13

Plant basal defense

Jun Liu

14

Plant innate immunity I

Jun Liu

15

Plant innate immunity II

Jun Liu

16

Plant epidemiology

Jun Liu

17

Disease management and plant protection/Third Exam

Jun Liu

Total

 

51

 

Textbook and any related course material:

Marc J. Klowden (2007) Physiological Systems in Insects. 2nd Ed. Elsevier Inc. (One annotated version permitted to publish in PRC)

George N. Agrios (2005) Plant Pathology, Fifth Edition Acadmeic Press, London, UK.

Reg Chapman (1997) The Insects Structure and Function 4th Ed. University Press, Cambridge, UK.

Lawrence I. Gilbert (2012) Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Acadmeic Press, London, UK.

 


 

 

Course title

Biochemistry 

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. ZHONG Liangwei and Professor ZHANG zhuqing

Course type:

Lectures and project works

Course Assessment:

A written final examination and an oral presentation of a project work.

Grading Policy:

An open written final examination (60%), an oral presentation of a project work (30%) and attendance (10%).

Course Prerequisites:

knowledge on organic chemistry.

Catalog Description:

Upon completion of the course, the students should: (1) be familiar with the basic properties and functions of amino acids and proteins, as well as the principle for protein separation, purification, identification; (2) know how to analyze enzyme activity, enzyme kinetics and protein-protein interaction; (3) understand protein synthesis, targeting and modifications; (4) understand the association of abnormal glucose, lipid and amino acid metabolism with diseases; (5) be able to explain connections among carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism; (6) be able to evaluate biochemical literatures and give an oral presentation.

Content

The course is divided into the following parts:

Introduction to Biochemistry (Professor ZHONG liangwei)  

Section A – Amino acids and proteins (Professor ZHONG liangwei)  

A1. Amino acids and proteins  

A2. Structures and functions of proteins 

A3. Purification of proteins  

Section B – Enzymes (Professor ZHONG Liangwei)  

B1. Properties of enzymes

B2. Factors affecting enzyme activity

B3. Enzyme kinetics and inhibition

Section C – Protein synthesis, targeting, modifications and folding (Professor ZHONG Liangwei and Associate Professor ZHANG zhuqing) 

   C1. Protein synthesis

   C2. Protein targeting

   C3. Protein modifications 

C4. Protein folding and protein structure prediction (Associate Professor ZHANG zhuqing) 

    C5. Protein design and structure-based drug design (Associate Professor ZHANG zhuqing)

Section D – Carbohydrate metabolism (Professor ZHONG Liangwei)  

 D1. Basic properties of carbohydrates

 D2. Metabolic pathways

 D3. Digestion and absorption 

 D4. High glucose and oxidative stress

Section E – Lipid metabolism (Professor ZHONG Liangwei)  

E1. Structure and roles of fatty acids

E2. Fatty acid breakdown and synthesis

E3. Cholesterol metabolism 

E4. Lipoproteins

Section F – Nitrogen metabolism (Professor ZHONG Liangwei)  

F1. Nitrogen fixation and assimilation

F2. Amino acid metabolism

F3. Urea cycle

Section G — Electron Transport and Oxidative Phosphorylation (Professor ZHONG Liangwei)

G1. The electron transport chains 

G2. Oxidative phosphorylation.

Teaching methods

  • The teaching includes lectures and project works. 
  • Project works encourage intensive reading of literatures, giving an oral presentation.

Suggested Textbook, References, and Link

  • Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, fourth edition.
  • Oxidative stress, inflammation and carcinogenesis are controlled through the pentose phosphate pathway by transaldolase, Trends Mol Med 17 (2011) 395-403.
  • Regulation of cellular metabolism by protein lysine acetylation, Science 327 (2010) 1000-1004.
  • Thioredoxin 1 Is Inactivated Due to Oxidation Induced by Peroxiredoxin under Oxidative Stress and Reactivated by the Glutaredoxin System, J Biol Chem. 288 (2013) 32241-32247.
  • Entrez Medlinehttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ 


 

 

Course title

Conservation Biology

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. JIANG Zhigang and Associate Professor LIU Xuecong

Course type:

Lecture, classroom exercise, student presentations

Course Schedule:

4 hrs/week3 hr. lecture by instructors, one hr. Offline Reading Course. Inverted Classroom: Student presentation session will be held after the main course presentations.  

19:00-21:50. Wednesday, offline reading section 1 hr, (Starts form the 2nd March, 2022).

Virtue Classroom2022/03/02-2022/06/29 19:00-21:50(GMT+08:00) 

Conservation Biology 2022 

https://meeting.tencent.com/dm/BEIEVZTDNbgg 

Tencent Meeting Room #879-4732-7219

Course Assessment:

Homework: 3 assignments

Grading Policy:

40% reading course, 60% final exam + class attendance.

Course Prerequisites:

University level education in Biology, Biological Technology or applied biology sciences like Agricultural Science, Forestry Science, Environmental Science, Aquatic and Oceanic Sciences, Medical and Veterinary Science as well as in University level education in Education Science and Management Science.

Catalog Description:

Conservation Biology is a science of protecting biodiversity, preventing human caused species extinctions and maintaining sustainable development of human society. Conservation Biology was established in mid-1990s in the United States of America, and it has fully grown into a main stream science since its’ born. In this course, the professor will start with the lecture, The Pandora’s Box: Zoonosis and Conservation, to illustrate the emerging and reemerging of pandemic disease, particularly zoonosis- the wild animal human share disease and its impacts on human society, taking the outbreak of COVID-19 pneumonia as an example to shed lights on the new challenge in Conservation Biology. Then the instructor will give a briefly review of human civilization, followed by introducing the new concepts such as public goods, consumerism, and consumer behavior in modern society, and the professor will emphasize the needs of rethinking about the doctrines in the master piece of philosophy, Tao Te Ching, and social norms. Then the professor will talk about the history, scope and missions as well as theoretic frames and practice measures of Conservation Biology. In the following lectures, the professor will present the principles, methods and characteristics of Conservation Biology, which now is transforming into a new science—Conservation Sciences. Dr. Liu will give an introduction to experimental design and data analyses in conservation with computer practice in the classroom. Species diversity is the core of biodiversity. The professor will introduce the concept of species in evolution, the famous question in science: “How many species are there on Earth?”, plus the Tree of Life, then the professor will elaborate the speciation and extinction of species and the last effort of reviving an extinct species—the de-extinction protocol. 

Global Change is important issue and it is also a disputing issue. The professor will trace the issue and talk about its impacts on conservation with examples form the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and the arctic. Plausible mitigation measures of the impacts of global change will be given. The professor will outline the mega biodiversity countries, biodiversity hot spots, global vs. China’s biomes. The professor will also introduce the diverse landscapes, the sharply contrasting climate types, different habitats and rich fauna and flora in the country. Dr. Liu will talk about the conservation of primates with stories of social behavior of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey. The professor will talk about the threatened wild species and degraded natural ecosystems in the country due to intensified human activities, land-cover change, environmental pollution, growing of human population plus the influence of global change. The professor will talk the legend of giant panda as an example of flagship species and talk about the down-listing of giant panda in China’s Red List of Biodiversity in 2016, at same time introduce the IUCN Red List Criteria for Endangered Species and China’s Red List of Vertebrate, with exercise in assessing species using the IUCN Red List Criteria for Endangered Species. The professor will elaborate the biodiversity relevant international treaties like Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which provide the international law environment for conservation and the country ‘s endeavor in implementation its commitments. Besides to conduct basic research in classifying, inventorying and monitoring biodiversity, the scientists in country also carried out conservation researches to back up the commitments of the government to implementation of CBD and CITES, such as rescuing endangered species, reforesting the mountains and deserts, as well as protecting habitat of wild species and maintaining ecosystem functioning and services. All these be covered in the course. Therefore, while reviewing the current development of Conservation Biology in the world, the professor will give case studies of China’s endemic species; represent biomes and conservation practice to enrich the contents of course. Small population is a real problem in conservation, with practice in computer simulation, the students will understand the genetic problems in small populations. In situ and ex situ conservation are major approaches in preserving biodiversity. The professor will explain why should we carry out ex situ conservation and how to carry out it, with examples of ex situ conservation from Saudi Arabia and from China. The professor will introduce the translocation of endangered species and reintroduction of locally extinct species. The professor will introduce the protected areas (PAs) such as, natural reserves, wildlife refuge, national parks, nature parks, World Natural Heritage Sites, as well as the “Green for Grain”, “Green for Grass” projects in China as examples of in situ conservation, and will review the “Half Earth” initiative and the development and analyze the achievements and shortfalls in management of PAs.  

According to the new requirement of the UCAS in 2020, the professors are required to add contents about the scientific reading to improve the reading comprehensive ability of the students of the course. Reading Skills for Students in Conservation Science will be added to the course in four lectures with three chapters in each lecture. 

"Inverted Classroom". The part of the student oral presentations in the course lectures serve as "Inverted Classroom". Such a practice is a rearrangement of lectures to student presentations, shifting the power of learning to students. Each student in the course will have time to focus more on proactive project-based learning, working together to address localization or globalization challenges and other real-world issues to understand conservation. The classroom is thus inverted that requires students to work independently before the student oral presentations, to access materials in library, to read enhanced e-books, to search for reference and to discuss with other students on the Internet. The professor and Teaching Assistant will guide the student presentation and will lead corresponding discussion in the inverted classroom. The professor and Teaching Assistant will communicate with everyone in the classroom through Internet. In the Inverted Classroom, students independently worked out plan for learning and presentation of knowledge, while The professor and Teaching Assistant will adopt teaching and collaboration methods to meet the needs of students and facilitate their personalized learning and presentation. The goal of student presentation in Inverted Classroom is to let students learn more real know-how from their thesis and future career through practice.

 

Schedule of the course

Lecture*

Contents

1

  1. The Pandora’s Box: Zoonosis and Conservation (Prof. Jiang)
  1.  Offline Reading in Conservation 1: Introduction (Prof. Jiang)

2

  1. History of Conservation (Prof. Jiang)
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 2: Reading through the Internet (Prof. Jiang)

3

  1. Principles, Ideas and Methods (Prof. Jiang)
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 3: Comprehensive Reading (Prof. Jiang)

4

  1. Speciation, Extinction and De-Extinction (Prof. Jiang)
  1.  Offline Reading in Conservation 4: Speed reading (Prof. Jiang)

5

  1.  Biodiversity in Agriculture and Biodiversity in China (Prof. Jiang)
  1. Offline Reading in Conservation 5: Critical Reading (Prof. Jiang)

6

  1. Introduction to Conservation Genetics (Prof. Jiang)
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 6: Intensive Reading(Prof. Jiang)

7

  1. Ex situ conservation (Prof. Jiang)
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 7: Reference Management (Prof. Jiang)

8

  1. Endangered Species Criteria and IUCN Red lists (Prof. Jiang)
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 8: Summarizing and Reviewing(Prof. Jiang)

9

  1. Protected Areas
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 9: Learning Writing from Reading(Prof. Jiang)

10

  1. Global change and its impacts on conservation
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 10: Learn to Review Manuscripts(Prof. Jiang)

11 

  1. Introduction to Experimental Design and Data Analyses in Conservation (Prof. Liu)
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 11: Presenting What You Read(Prof. Jiang)

12

  1. Status, Behavior and Conservation of Primates(Prof. Liu)
  2. Offline Reading in Conservation 12: Preparing for Your Future(Prof. Jiang)

13

"Inverted Classroom"Student Presentation I (Prof. Jiang)

14

"Inverted Classroom"Student Presentation II(Prof. Jiang)

15 

Examination


 

Contents of the course

Lecture 1: The Pandora’s Box: Zoonosis and Conservation

  1. The outbreak of COVID--19 in 2019
  2. The diseases and zoonosis 
  3. An example: Lyme disease (Video7:38)
  4. The Black Death 
  5. The remerging and newly emerging diseases
  6. Who opens the Pandora Box?
  7. Infectious disease and wildlife populations
  8. MERS, SARS, COVID-19, lessons so far for conservation…

Lecture 2: History of Conservation

  1. Human civilization
  2. The biodiversity crisis
  3. The nascent of Conservation Biology
  4. Public goods, consumerism and consumer behavior 
  5. Environment problems we confronted
  6. Rethink about Tao Te Ching and Social Norms
  7. The nascent of Conservation Biology

Lecture 3 Principles, Ideas and Methods in Conservation Science

  1. Mega biodiversity countries
  2. Biodiversity hot spots
  3. Physical geography of China
  4. Case study: Video BBC Wild China
  5. Vegetation: global vs. China
  6. Origin centers of crops in the world
  7. Crops, fruits and garden plants native to the far east

Lecture 4 Introduction to Experimental Design and Data Analyses in Conservation

  1. Experimental design in Conservation
  2. Descriptive statistics
  3. Hypothesis testing
  4. Introduction to SPSS
  5. A classroom practice

Lecture 5 Speciation, Extinction and De-Extinction

  1. Evolution of species concept
  2. The Tree of Life
  3. How many species are there on the Earth?
  4. Speciation
  5. Extinction of species
  1. The De-Extinction

Lecture 6 Global Change and its Impacts On Conservation

  1. Global change: what is happening now?
  2. The evidence and arguments
  3. Why the dispute
  4. Impacts of global change on conservation

Lecture 7 Diversity in Agriculture and Biodiversity in China

  1. Mega biodiversity countries
  2. Biodiversity hot spots
  3. Physical geography of China
  4. Video BBC Wild China
  5. Vegetation: global vs. China
  6. Origin centers of crops in the world
  7. Crop and domestic animal diversity in agriculture 
  8. Crops, fruits and garden plants native to the far east

Lecture 8: The Small Population Problem in Conservation

  1. The small population problem
  2. The Extinction Vortex
  3. The inbreeding 
  4. The genetic draft
  5. The genetic purge 
  6. The classroom practice Web PopGen® simulation 

Lecture 9: Criteria of Endangered Species and IUCN Red lists

  1. Criteria of endangered species
  2. The Down-listing of giant panda in 2016
  3. The legend of giant panda
  4. IUCN Red List for Endangered Species
  5. China’s Red List for Vertebrates

Lecture 10: Status, Behavior and Conservation of Primates

  1. Primates of the world
  2. Primate societies
  3. Conservation status of primates in China
  4. Ecology of endangered golden snub-nosed monkeys
  5. Vocal behavior of golden snub-nosed monkeys

Lecture 11: Ex-situ Conservation

  1. Why ex situ conservation?
  2. How to carry out ex situ conservation?
  3. Case study: Wildlife Conservation Center in Saudi Arabic
  4. Reintroduction of Saiga in China
  5. Behavioral problems in captive bred animals
  6. A synthesis: Captive Breeding of Giant Panda
  7. Ex situ conservation of plants: Germplasm resource repository and botanical gardens
  8. Artificial propagation of Drebremium

Lecture 12: Protected Areas

  1. The definition of Protected Areas (PAs) by IUCN
  2. IUCN categories of PAs
  3. The growth of PAs in the world and in China
  4. The challenges in the PAs management
  5. The conservation migratory species: the example of Mongolian gazelle
  6. The Half-Earth Initiative--How much land we can set aside?

Lecture 13: Student presentation I 

Lecture 14: Student presentation II

The final mark of the student will be 20% attendance and 40% the presentation of the reading exercise + 40% final exam. The final exam will be an open-class exam.

 

Offline Reading Skills for Students in Conservation Science

The outlines 

The plan to give the Reading Skills for Students in Conservation Science in the course of Conservation Biology is introduced below. Each part of the following 8 parts will be given at the fourth lecture hour of each lecture. Students will give their presentation about literature reading choosing one of the three topics listed below. The presentations of students will be arranged into 2 lecture sections, we have slots for all students registered so far, if more students take the course, we will extend the student presentation section. 

Part I     General introduction

I.I       Why?

  • Knowledge building/Learning
  • Master the skill of critical reading
  • The needs of self-taught

I.II      How?

  • Comprehensive reading
  • Intensive reading
  • Critical reading

I.III    What?

  • Scientific literature 
  • Science media
  • Popular science

Part II    Reading through the Internet

  • The Knowledge Explosion 
  • The Internet Revolution 
  • A convenient, efficient and prevalent way
  • Knowledge mining from the internet  

Part III   Comprehensive reading

  • For academic learning
  • For general interests
  • For leisure (time-killing) 

Part IV  Fast reading

  • How get the main ideas of what you read?
  • The abstracts and summaries
  • The tables and figures
  • The topic sentences
  • Building your vocabulary  

Part V    Intensive reading

  • Learning the methodology
  • Master the new advances
  • Discover new direction for study

Part VI  Critical reading 

  • Learn to ask questions
  • Learn to be critic 
  • Find out the key points from a paper or a book

Part VII Learn to review or to comment on manuscripts 

  • What is the aim of the manuscript?
  • Is the problem worth of study?
  • What is the question/working hypothesis/the goal in the study? 
  • How did the authors test the hypothesis or achieve the goal stated? 
  • What did the authors find?
  • Did author(s) discuss the implication and problems associated with the study? 
  • Is the author(s) read the current relevant literature for the study?

Part VIII Taking notes and managing reference 

  • Download the reference
  • Keeping taking notes
  • Using a reference management tool  

Part IX Summarizing and Reviewing

  • Be prepared for your thesis/dissertation
  • A literature review for your study topic
  • The general review chapter(s) for your thesis/dissertation

Part X Learning writing from reading

  • A good scientist is also a good writer
  • Learn writing from reading
  • Take a writing course, starting from writing a sentence …

Part XI Preparing for your future 

  • What career in conservation?
  • What are your interests?
  • Where are the information?
  • Be prepared, always 

Part XII Presentation of what you read

  • Writing an outline
  • Design your PPT
  • Practice 
  • Be concise, confident, clear, remember the time limit is a key issue

 

The outlines for the presentations by student

Choosing one of the following topics, each student should give a 15-min presentation with his/her own PPTs, each give a 12-min talk + 3-min questions and comments by professors and his/her peer.

 

Tentative topics for student presentations:  

a)    My future study area

b)    A hot domain/A new advance in science

c)    I discovered something worth of further study in conservation/science

The key points in your presentation:

For Topic a) My future study area, you should talk about the following points:   

  • The back ground of the literature searching (What are current status of the field and how do you find the reference to the recent development?)
  • The maintain discovery in the field (Talking about key literature in the field)
  • The weakness in methodology, the knowledge gap in the field. or your plan to work on the issue in foreseeable future 

 For Topic b) A hot domain/A new advance in science, you should talk about the following points: 

  • The back ground of the literature searching (How do you find the topic?)
  • The maintain discovery in the field (Talking about key literature in the field)
  • The weakness in methodology, the knowledge gap in the field. or your comment of the development in the field.

For Topic c) I discovered something worth of further study in conservation/science, you should talk about the following points:

  • How did you find the issue in reading?)
  • The general introduction to the discovery
  • Why do you think it is a hot topic? What are the likely impact on society or scientific work in foreseeable future?

Textbook and any related course material:

Gaston, K. J. 1996. Biodiversity: A Biology of Numbers and Differences. Oxford: Blackwell Science.

Hannah L.2012. Saving a Million Species: Extinction Risk from Climate Change. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Jeon Yonung-jae. 2012. Journey to the Ecosystem of the DMZ and CCL. Seoul: Korea National Park Serves, Ministry of Environment.

Jiang, Z. 2016. The deterministic effect of the CITES and nominal impacts of social norms on global wildlife trade. RE: “Collective Action: Social norms as solutions” Science 354:42-43. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6308/42.e-letters.

Jiang, Z. 2016. The responsibility and readiness of young conservation scientists. E-letter to P. Gluckman. The science–policy interface. Science 353: 969. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/353/6303/969.e-letters

Jiang Z. 2002. Key Topics in Biodiversity and its Conservation, an English training book for UNDP/UNEP/GEF Biodiversity Support Program for the Northwest and East Central Asia Region.

McCord E L. 2012. The Value of Species. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Novacek, M.J. 2001. The Biodiversity Crisis. New York: The New Press.

Primack, R. B. 2010. Essentials of Conservation Biology. 5th ed. Sinauer Associates, Inc. Sunderland, USA.

Stearns, BP and Stearns SN. 1999. Watch, from the Edge of Extinction. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Wilson, E. O. 2001. The Diversity of Life. London: Penguin Books. [Twice winner of Pulitzer Price]

 

Video BBC Wild China

Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:

University level education in Biology, Biological Technology or applied biology sciences like Agricultural Science, Forestry Science, Environmental Science, Aquatic and Oceanic Sciences, Medical and Vet Science as well as in University level education in Education Science and Management Science 

 


 

 

Course title

Introduction to Epigenetics and RNA silencing 

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. Xiaoming Zhang 010-64807550   zhangxm@ioz.ac.cn

Prof. Xianhui Wang  010-64807220    wangxh@ioz.ac.cn

Prof. Weiqiang Qian (Peking University)010-62768230   wqqian@pku.edu.cn

Teaching assistant:

Dr. Qi Li 010-64807550 liqi@ioz.ac.cn

Course type:

Lecture

Course Assessment:

mini-tests in each section

Grading Policy:

mini-tests scores

Course Prerequisites:

Without

Catalog Description:

Epigenetics and RNA silencing are two of the hottest topics in the past two decades. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression that do not change DNA sequence. RNA silencing is a general regulation mechanism in eukaryotes that regulates gene expression by 20-30 nt sRNAs in transcription or post-transcription levels. In this Epigenetics, we will introduce how DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, long non-coding RNAs and RNA modification regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. In the second part, we will study RNA silencing on sRNA generation, amplification, loading, action, turnover, and function. The most popular technologies used in Epigenetic studies and non-coding RNAs will also be discussed.

This course not only will provide students the basic concepts of RNA silencing and Epigenetics, but also will provide student the requisite methods in these two fields. At the same time, we will share the students a story in RNA silencing or Epigenetic fields in each class. These stories include but not limit to: Transgenic technology, Cross-kingdom RNA silencing, anti-viral function of RNA silencing, X-inactivation, Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, Imprinting, disease, Honey bee epigenome, and flowing. After the course, the students should understand the biogenesis and function of small RNAs, lncRNAs, the difference between genetic and epigenetic regulation and how to study projects relate to Epigenetics and RNA silencing.

Schedule of the course

section

Content

Hours

1

Introduction to Epigenetics and RNA silencing

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

2

Histone modification / X-inactivation

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

3

Histone variation / Epigenetics regulation in disease

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

4

Chromatin remodeling / Epigenetics in flowering

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

5

DNA methylation-establishment and maintenance / Imprinting

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

6

DNA demethylation / Molecular tools to study DNA methylation

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

7

Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance / Honey bee epigenome

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

8

sRNA processing / Genetic engineering

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

9

sRNA amplification and loading / RNA silencing function in plant immunity to virus

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

10

Target recognition and action of sRNAs / Popular tools to study RNAi

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

11

The modification and degradation of sRNAs / Animal virus and RNA silencing

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

12

The movement of RNA silencing / Cross-kingdom RNAi

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

13

The application of RNA silencing in research, human health and crop production

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

14

Long non-coding RNA, Circular RNA and RNA modifications

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

15

Bioinformatics tools to study RNA silencing and Epigenetic

Class teaching 3h+After class discussion and Quiz 1h

Total

 

60

 

Textbook and any related course material:

C. David Allis, Marie-Laure Caparros, Thomas Jenuwein, Danny Reinberg (2015) Epigenetics2nd Ed, CSHL press.

Narendra Tuteja, Sarvajeet Singh Gill (2013) Plant Acclimation to Environmental Stress, Springer.

Kenneth Alan Howard (2013) RNA Interference from Biology to Therapeutics (Advances in Delivery Science and Technology), Springer.

Tamas Dalmay (2017), Plant Gene Silencing: Mechanisms and Applications, CABI press. 

 


 

 

Course title

Nanobiological Sensing and Detection 

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. Lele Li

Course type:

Lecture

Course Assessment:

Homework: 7 assignments

Grading Policy:

Assignments 50%, Final 30%, Attendance 20%

Course Prerequisites:

College Chemistry, College Materials, English.

Catalog Description:

Biosensing and imaging using nanomaterials and nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize scientific research and medical diagnostics. This course will focus on the principles, construction, and application of Nano-biosensing and imaging systems, and particularly the impact of nanotechnology on the development of biosensors. The course will be started with an introduction of the solid background on the nano-biological sensors, bioimaging, nanomaterials and nanotechnology, biorecognition units, biomarkers, and disease diagnostics. Then, examples of biosensing and imaging systems created from various nanomaterials are introduced, including fluorescent/luminescent nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, porous materials, and DNA nanostructures, with a distinct emphasis on the need to tailor nanosensor designs to specific biotargets. The topic of cancer-specific nano-biosensors will also be addressed and discussed to provide deep insight into the recent advances of using nano-biosensors for disease diagnostics and therapy.

Schedule of the course

No.

content

hours

1

Introduction of nano-biosensing and imaging technology 

3

2

Nanostructured materials used for construction of biosensing and imaging systems

3

3

Surface functionalization of nanomaterials with biorecognition unit

3

4

Principles of biosensing and imaging design for overcoming biological barriers

3

5

Quantum dots-based fluorescent biosensing and imaging

3

6

Lanthanide ions-doped nanomaterials for luminescent biosensing and imaging

3

7

Fluorescent biosensors based on aggregation-induced emission

3

8

Flipped classroom- Fluorescent nanoparticles for biosensing 

3

9

DNA nanotechnology for biosensing and imaging

3

10

Flipped classroom- DNA nanotechnology for biosensing

3

11

Mesoporous silica-based biosensing and imaging

3

12

Metal-organic frameworks-based biosensing and imaging

3

13

Flipped classroom- Porous nanoparticles for biosensing

3

14

Magnetic nanomaterials-based biosensing and imaging

3

15

Gold nanomaterials-based biosensing and imaging

3

16

Flipped classroom- Metal nanoparticles for biosensing

3

17

Carbon nanomaterials-based biosensing and imaging

3

18

Students presentation and discussion

3

19

Students presentation and discussion

3

20

Final exam

3

total

 

60


Textbook and any related course material:

No textbook, and electronic course reading materials will be provided one week before each class.  
 

Course title

Nanotechnology for Solar Energy Utilization Applications

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. HE Tao

Course type:

Lecture

Course Assessment:

Four assignments: Exercise & Presentation

Grading Policy:

Typically 40% presentation, 40% exercise, 20% final

Course Prerequisites:

Materials physics, materials chemistry, solid state physics, semiconductor physics, physical chemistry, general chemistry

Catalog Description:

Because of concerns regarding energy security, environmental crisis, and the rising costs of fossil-fuel-based energy, there has been significant, resurgent interest in utilization of solar energy recently due to its clean nature and abundance of the source. Unfortunately, the utilization efficiency is still pretty low, which dramatically limits the wide use of solar energy. Nanotechnology may afford a solution to this. Thus, the major goal of this course is to provide the students general concepts and state-of-the-art developments in the field of nanotechnology for solar energy utilization. The course begins with a brief introduction of fundamentals of nanotechnology and solar energy. Then photon (light) management is discussed in detail, followed by a thorough description of conversion of light into electric energy (photovoltaics) and chemical energy (artificial photosynthesis). Detailed discussion of environmental remedy is covered too. Other applications such as thermoelectricity and thermochemistry are presented in the final session.

Schedule of the course

Section

Content

Hours

1

Chapter 1. Fundamentals of nanotechnology and solar energy

Chapter 2. Optical properties of nanomaterials and nanostructures

4

2

Chapter 3. Light harvesting and conversion

4

3

Exercise I & Student presentation I

4

4

Chapter 4. Photovoltaic device physics on the nanoscale

4

5

Chapter 5. Inorganic photovoltaic devices

4

6

Chapter 6. Organic solar cells

Chapter 7. Dye-sensitized & perovskite solar cells

4

7

Exercise II & Student presentation II

4

8

Chapter 8. Photosynthesis and bioenergy

Chapter 9. Fundamentals of photocatalysis

4

9

Chapter 10. Water splitting

4

10

Chapter 11. Photoreduction of carbon dioxide

4

11

Chapter 12. Environmental remediation (organic pollutants, heavy metals, water purification, etc.)

4

12

Exercise III & Student presentation III

4

13

Chapter 13. Thermoelectricity

Chapter 14. Thermochemistry

4

14

Chapter 15. Energy storage

Chapter 16. Photodetection and imaging

Chapter 17. Summary and outlook

4

15

Exercise IV & Student presentation IV

4

Total

 

60


 

Textbook and related documents:

No specific textbooks, though the following ones are listed. More reading materials will be provided during the lecture.

Nanostructured and photoelectrochemical systems for solar photon conversion, Edited by Mary D. Archer and Arthur J. Nozik, Imperial College Press, London, 2009

Nanostructured materials for solar energy conversion, Edited by Tetsuo Soga, Elsevier Science, 2007

Nanotechnology for Photovoltaics, Edited by Loucas Tsakalakos, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2010

 


 

 

Course title

Nano Electronic Materials

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. XIE Liming

Course type:

Lecture

Course Assessment:

Homework: 10 assignments

Grading Policy:

Typically 20% attendance, 20% in-class performance, 40% homework, 20% final.

Course Prerequisites:

Solid state physics, physical chemistry 

Catalog Description:

This course will first give a general review on nano electronic materials, including structure, synthesis and properties. And then introduce typical nano electronic materials in details. The typical nano electronic materials include quantum dots, nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, two-dimensional materials beyond graphene. 

Schedule of the course

section

content

hours

1

Motivation and surface effect

4

2

Quantum confinement effect

4

3

Synthesis methods of nano electronic materials

4

4

Characterization methods

4

5

Characterization methods

4

6

Device fabrication techniques

4

7

Electrical measurement

4

8

Quantum dots

3

9

Nanowires

3

10

Carbon nanotubes

3

11

Graphene

3

12

Transition-metal dichalcogenides and Other 2D materials

3

13

Presentation skills and discussion

3

14

Presentations by students

3

15

Presentations by students

3

total

 

52


Textbook and any related course materials:

  1. Introduction to the Physics of Nanoelectronics, Edited by: S.G. Tan and M.B.A. Jalil, ISBN: 978-0-85709-511-4
  2. Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics, Edited by: George W. Hanson, ISBN-10: 0131957082
  3. Nanotechnology and Nanoelectronics: Materials, Devices, Measurement Techniques, Edited by: W. R. Fahrner, ISBN 3-540-22452-1

Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:

Mathematics: strong

Physics: strong

Chemistry: strong

Course title

Plate Tectonics and Evolution of Tibetan Plateau

Instructor(s):

Prof. Lin Ding et al.

Course type:

Lecture

Course type:

Lecture

Catalog Description:

Plate tectonics is an integrated scientific theory that describes how the large-scale geologic structures on Earth are created as a result of Earth’s plates movements. In plate tectonics, the lithosphere — Earth's strong, rigid outermost shell—is broken into many tectonic plates, which lie on top of the weaker, ductile asthenosphere. Due to the convection of the asthenosphere, the plates move relative to each other and interact along their boundaries, where they converge, diverge, or slip past one another. These interactions generate many phenomena, such as mountain building, large continents, wide and deep oceans, volcanoes and earthquakes. To begin our explanation of the key elements of plate tectonics theory, we will first learn about the physical and chemical structures of the earth, types of plate boundaries, subduction zones and other special locations on plates. We will see how continents break up, how they collide, what makes plates move, and their relationships with petrology, paleomagnetism and geodynamics.

We will then introduce the application of plate tectonics on Himalayan-Tibetan Orogen. The India-Eurasia collision is the most significant geological event throughout the Phanerozoic and eventually created the youngest and most spectacular Himalaya-Tibetan Orogen on Earth. During the continental collision, Indian continental lithosphere began to subduct beneath Eurasian continent and further induced large-scale deformation, magmatism and metamorphism. More importantly, the continental collision induced rapid uplift of the Himalaya-Tibetan Plateau. The uplift of the large and high elevations (>5000m) of the Tibetan Plateau has not only affected regional geomorphology and geographical environments of Asia, but also impacted on regional or even global climate change. Therefore, the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen provides an ideal natural laboratory to investigate the mountain building process in general. It will cover the following topics:

Schedule of the course

Section

Content

hours

1

Plate tectonics and its developing history 

  1. Introduction to Plate Tectonics
  2. The Structure of the Earth

2.1 Three Layers

2.2 Physical Properties

2.3 Chemical Compositions

  1. Continental Drift

3.1 Principal Observations

3.2 The Implications

  1. Seafloor Spreading

4.1 Seafloor Topography

4.2 Age of the Seafloor

4.3 Oceanic Ridge System

  1. Accreting Plate Boundaries

5.1 Divergent Plate Boundaries

5.2 Convergent Plate Boundaries

5.3 Transform Plate Boundaries

  1. Subduction

6.1 Distribution of Subduction zones 

6.2 Deep Structure of the Subduction Zones

  1. Continents 

7.1 The Growth of Continents

7.2 Continental Margins

  1. Hotspots and Mantle Plumes

8.1 Mantle Convection

8.2 Surface Volcanisms

8.3 Deep Origin of Mantle Plumes

  1. The Wilson Cycle

9.1 Traditional Wilson Cycle Model 

9.2 The Implications

  1. Planetary Perspective

10.1 The Early History

10.2 Comparative Planetary

15

2

Petrology and Plate Tectonics

1. Introduction to Petrology and Plate Tectonics

1.1 Material composition of the Earth

1.2 What’s the petrology?

1.3 Research methods

1.4 Plate Tectonics Review

1.5 Rocks in plate boundaries

1.6 Rocks in inner plate

2. Igneous Petrology

2.1 Fundamental concepts

2.2 Common rocks 

2.3 Magma Generation

2.4 Magmatism and Plate Tectonics

3. Metamorphic Petrology:

      3.1Fundamental concepts

3.2 Subduction-related “Paired metamorphic belts”

  3.3 P-T-t path and contributions to Plate tectonics

4. Sedimentary Petrology:

4.1 Fundamental concepts

4.2 Common rocks

4.3 “Bouma sequence” and “Galileo’s free fall”

  4.4 “Facies” and Palaeoenvironments

5. “Ophiolite”

  5.1 What’s ophiolite?

  5.2 Contribution to the Tibetan Plateau 

15

3

Paleomagnetism and Plate Tectonics

  1. Introduction to Geomagnetism

1.1 Earth Magnetic Field

1.2 History

1.3 Study Fields

  1. Basic Rock Magnetism

2.1 Magnetic Properties

2.2 Magnetic Mineralogy

2.3 Magnetic Domains

2.4 Hysteresis

2.5 Natural Remanent Magnetism (NRM)

  1. Sampling, Measurement, Analysis and Field Tests

3.1 Collection of Paleomagnetic Samples

3.2 Demagnetization Techniques

3.3 Display and Bedding-tilt Correction

3.4 Identification of Ferromagnetic Minerals

3.5 The Fold Test

3.6 Synfolding Magnetization

3.7 Conglomerate Test

3.8 Reversals Test

3.9 Baked Contact and Consistency Tests

3.10 Other Tests

  1. Magnetic Reversals and Inclination Shallowing

4.1 Magnetic Reversals

4.2 Paleomagnetic Geochronlogy

4.3 Inclination Shallowing 

  1. Plate Tectonics and Sea Floor Spreading

5.1 Plate Tectonic Theory and Paleomagnetism

5.2 Sea Floor Spreading Hypothesis and Paleomagnetism

  1. Paleomagnetic Poles and Paleogeographic Reconstruction

6.1 Procedure for Pole Determination

6.2 Types of Poles

6.3 Sampling of Geomagnetic Secular Variation

6.4 Paleogeographic Reconstruction

  1. Regional Tectonics-Collision and Shortening

7.1 Evolution of the Tibetan Plateau and Tethys

7.2 India-Asia Collision Time and Shortening

7.3 Regional Tectonics-Regional Rotations

7.4 Rotations of the NE Tibetan Plateau

7.5 Rotations of the SE Tibetan Plateau

7.6 Rotations of the Tibetan Plateau

15

4

Fundamentals of geodynamics 

1. A brief introduction on geodynamics

  1.1 The deforming earth

  1.2 Plate tectonics: what it can tell us?

  1.3 What is geodynamics?

  1.4 What this course will tell you?

2. Stress and strain in solids

  2.1 Force and stress

  2.2 Stress state in 2D and 3D

  2.3 Pressure in the deep interiors of the earth

  2.4 Strain

  2.5 Measurements of stress and strain

3. Elasticity and flexure of the solid earth

  3.1 Linear elasticity

  3.2 Uniaxial stress and strain

  3.3 Plane stress and strain

  3.4 Pure and simple shear

  3.5 Bending and flexure of plate in two dimensions

  3.6 Flexure with basin and mountain tectonics 

4. Rock Rheology

  4.1 Diffusion creep

  4.2 Dislocation creep

  4.3 Temperature- and stress-dependent rheology

  4.4 Crustal rheology and viscoelasticity

  4.5 Mantle convection and plate motions 

5. Faulting

  5.1 Classification of Faults

  5.2 Mohr-circle theory

  5.3 Friction on faults

  5.4 Anderson theory of faulting

  5.5 Coulomb failure criterion and strength envelop

  5.6 Earthquake faulting

6. Geodynamic remarks of on the Tibetan plateau

  6.1 Deformation from plate boundary to plate interior

  6.2 Decadal to millennia time-dependent deformation        

  6.3 Available geodynamic models of the Tibetan plateau

15

5

Plate Tectonic in Tibet Plateau

  1. Introduction of the Tibet plateau

1.1 Why is the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen so wide?

1.2 Why is the Tibetan Plateau so flat?

1.3 Why are the boundarys so steep?

1.4 Why is the Tibetan plateau just so high and no higher?

  1. Process of Gondwana split and Asian continent aggregation

2.1 The Gondwana super continent

2.2 The split of the Gondwana

2.3 The suture zones and aggregation in Tibet

  1. India and Eurasia collision

3.1 Methods to constrain the initial timing of collision

3.2 History of research on the initial timing of Indian and Asian collision

3.3 Deformation of the northern THS in the early collisional stage

3.4 Foreland basin system

3.5 Collision patterns and suturing processes between the Indian and Asian continents

  1. The Raising of Tibet plateau

4.1 Index of paleoelevation

4.2 The raising of Himalaya

4.3 The raising of Tibet

12

5

Exam

3

Total

 

75


 

 


 

 

Course title

Physical Geography 

Instructor(s):

Prof. XiaoMin Fang et al.

Course type:

Lecture

Catalog Description:

Physical Geography 2022 Spring semester is designed as an introduction course for research graduate students majored in the earth and environmental sciences. As a foundation in the study of geography, this course introduces the physical elements of the earth and the environment in which people live. The focus is on natural processes that create physical diversity on the earth, covering topics like weather and climate, vegetation and soils, landforms, ecosystems, their distribution and significance. This course is designed in an interactive way, combining basic theories and current research progress in several key fields. It enables the students to develop a broad understanding of geographic processes, and how human activity affects physical geography, especially in the Tibetan Plateau. The course is structured as a series of lectures with the topics listed as following: 

Schedule of the course

Section

Content

Time

Classroom

Date

1

Introduction of Physical Geography

1.1 Brief introduction

1.2 The earth and its rotation

1.3 Coordination system

1.4 The earth in the solar system

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

Tencent Meeting 49178382287

1-Mar

方小敏老师

2

Global Energy Balance 

2.1 Insolation to the earth

2.2 Global energy system

2.3 Energy redistribution and climate change 

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

8-Mar

 

3

Winds and Global Circulation

3.1 Air pressure, wind and cyclones-anticyclones

3.2 Wind circulation

3.3 Ocean circulation

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

15-Mar

 

4

Weather Systems

4.1 Air masses and fronts

4.2 Midlatitude anticyclones an cyclones

4.3 Tropic and equatorial weather systems

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

22-Mar

 

5

Earth materials

5.1 The structure of the earth

5.2 Earth materials and rocks

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

29-Mar

 

6

Tectonics and Landforms

61 Plate tectonics and global topography 

6.2 Tectonic landforms

6.2 Volcanic activity and landforms

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

5-Apr

 

7

Air Temperature, Moisture and Precipitation

7.1 Air temperature and vertical temperature structure

7.2Temperature change

7.3 Moisture and humidity

7.4 Precipitation formation and types

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

12-Apr

张凡

老师

8

Global Climates and Climate Change

8.1 Climate and classification 

8.2 Climate with latitude

8.3 climate change and causes

8.4 Mini-seminars:

  -student presentations and discussion

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

19-Apr

 

9

Weathering and Mass Wasting

9.1 Weathering 

9.2 Mass Wasting

Freshwater of the Continents

10.1 Hydrologic Cycle

10.2 Groundwater

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

26-Apr 

 

10

10.3 Streamflow

10.4 Lakes

10.5 Hydrological Model

10.6 Water as a Natural Resource

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

3-May

 

11

Landforms Made by Running Water

11.1 Erosion, Transportation, and Deposition

11.2 Stream Gradation and Evolution

11.3 Fluvial Landforms

11.4 Fluvial Processes in an Arid Climate

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

10-May

 

12

Global Biogeography and Biogeographic Process

12.1 Global Natural Vegetation and Climatic Belts

12.2 Terrestrial Ecosystem-Components, structure and function

12.3 Energy and Matter Flow in Ecosystem

12.4 Biodiversity

12.5 Human Disturbance to Natural Ecosystem

12.6 Methods of Ecosystem Studies

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

17-May

朱立平老师

13

Global Soils

13.1 The Nature of the Soil

13.2 Soil Chemistry

13.3 Soil Moisture

13.4 Soil Development

13.5 The Global Scope of Soils

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

24-May

 

14

Landforms Made by Wave and Wind

14.1 The Work of Waves and Tides

14.2 Coastal Landforms

14.3 Wind Action

14.4 Eolian Landforms

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

31-May 

15

Glacial and Periglacial Landforms

15.1 Glaciers and Their Types

15.2 Glacial Processes and Their Landforms

15.3 Periglacial Processes and Landforms

15.4 Glaciations and Climatic Changes

(After-school materials distribution)

Tue.

13:30-

16:20

Class5-7

 

7-Jun

 


 

 

 


 

 

Course title

Global Change Ecology

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. WANG Tao et al.

Course type:

Lecture

Grading Policy:

The grading for this course will be based on:

- Participation (30% of grade)

- Report (70% of grade)

*Participation in lectures, discussions, and other activities is an essential part of the instructional process. Students are expected to attend class regularly. Those who are compelled to miss class should inform the instructor of the reasons for absences. Unexcused late assignments will have at a minimum 5 points deducted. To avoid this penalty you must contact the instructor prior to the due date. Each student should be expected to give a report at the end of the course. 

Course Prerequisites:

This course does not have any pre-requisites.

Catalog Description:

This course is designed as an introductory course in ecology for graduate students majored in Earth Sciences. The class is intended to provide an introduction to main ecological processes, with particular attention to the responses of these processes to global change at local, regional, and global scales. It will also introduce the basic principles of local field measurement techniques, remote sensing, and land surface modeling in relation to carbon and nitrogen cycles. The course is structured as a series of lectures in which individual research cases are discussed with faculty tutors. It will cover the following topics:

Schedule of the course

Section

Content

hours

1

Introduction of global change ecology

4

2

Plant ecophysiological response

2.1  Concepts 

2.2  Methods - controlled experiment and stable isotope record

2.3  Responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen availability

2.4  Responses to warming and drought

2.5  Impacts of multiple factors and their interaction

8

3

Responses of terrestrial ecosystems

3.1  Forests

3.1.1  Cambial activity and wood structure of trees

3.1.2  Elevational and latitudinal distribution of forests

3.1.3  Global change and forest growth

3.2   Grasslands

3.2.1  Plant phenology

3.2.2  Plant composition and diversity

3.2.3  Plant production and decomposition

3.2.4  Greenhouse gas fluxes

3.2.5  Carbon sequestration

3.3  micro-organisms

3.3.1  The origin and evolution of microorganims

3.3.2  Classification of microorganims

3.3.3  The role of microorganims in the response of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change

3.3.4  Methods: controlled microcosms experiments and field investigation

3.3.5  Methods to study the microbial ecology

3.3.6  Responses to warming, precipitation and drought

3.3.7  Responses to eCO2 and N availability (GeoChip or high throughput seq)

24

4

Regional and global responses

4.1  Approaches: Satellite observations

4.2  Approaches: Land surface modeling

4.3  Terrestrial vegetation dynamics

4.4  Carbon cycle

4.5  Nitrogen cycle

20

5

Mitigation and adaption

5.1  Concepts 

5.2  Land use and reduce of GHG emissions

5.3  Accounting methodology of GHG reduction and monitoring

5.4  Carbon trade

4

Total

 

60


 

 


 

 

Course title

Climate Change

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. Dr.MA Yaoming

Course type:

Lecture

Catalog Description: 

Climate Change 2022 spring semester is designed as an introductory course plus our research aspect in ITPCAS (Institute of Tibetan Plateau, Chinese Academy of Sciences) in the Climate Change for graduate students majored in Earth Sciences. This class is a synthesis of current knowledge of the climate system and past and present climates. It provides solid background information and includes critical assessments of issues that remain incompletely understood. There, it is up to the students to logically evaluate climate change issues presented daily by the media. This class will introduce related reference for climate researchers and students, especially for issues of climate change in Earth system. The class presents the basics surrounding climate change in a simple way while pointing out the complexity of climate data collection, processing, and interpretation. Our research aspect in ITPCAS will introduce climate change related topics, for example, land surface heat flux retrieves from in-situ data, satellite remote sensing data and numerical model; land surface model development and data assimilation; black carbon in the mountain glacier area; hydrological model and so on. All of these topics will enhance our theoretical questions about climate change, especially in the Tibetan Plateau.

The course is structured as a series of lectures and mini-seminars in which individual research cases are discussed with faculty tutors. It will cover the following topics:

 

Schedule of the course

Section

Content

hours

Date

1 Prof. Yaoming Ma

Overview of Climate Change

1.1 Weather and climate

1.2 What do we mean by climate variability and climate change? 

1.3 Connections, timescales and uncertainties 

1.4 The big picture

3

28-Feb

2 Prof. Yaoming Ma

Radiation and the Earth’s energy balance

2.1 Solar and terrestrial radiation

2.2 Solar variability

2.3 Summary

3

7-Mar

3 Prof. Yaoming Ma

The elements of the climate

3.1 The atmosphere and oceans in motion

3.2 Atmospheric circulation patterns

3.3 Radiation balance

3.4 The hydrological cycle

3.5 The biosphere

3.6 Sustained abnormal weather patterns

3.7 Atmosphere–ocean interactions

3.8 The Great Ocean Conveyor

3.9 Summary

3

14-Mar

3” Prof. Yaoming Ma

Climate Change review

 

3

19-Mar

4 Prof. Baiqing Xu

Evidence of climate change

8.1 Peering into the abyss of time

8.2 From greenhouse to icehouse

8.3 Sea-level fluctuations

8.4 The ice ages

8.5 The end of the last ice age

8.6 The Holocene climatic optimum

8.7 Changes during times of recorded history

8.8 The medieval climatic optimum

8.9 The Little Ice Age

8.10 The twentieth-century warming

8.11 Concluding observations

3

21-Mar

5 Prof. Baiqing Xu

The natural causes of climate change

6.1 Auto-variance and non-linearity

6.2 Atmosphere–ocean interactions

6.3 Ocean currents

6.4 Volcanoes

6.5 Sunspots and solar activity

6.6 Tidal forces

6.7 Orbital variations

6.8 Continental drift

6.9 Changes in atmospheric composition

6.10 A belch from the deep

6.11 Catastrophes and the ‘nuclear winter’

6.12 Summary

 

3

28-Mar

6 Prof. Baiqing Xu

Human activities

7.1 Greenhouse gas emissions

7.2 Dust and aerosols

7.3 Desertification and deforestation

7.4 The ozone hole

7.5 Summary 

3

4-Apr

6” Prof. Baiqing Xu

climate change review 2

3

9-Apr

7 Prof. Lei Wang

The measurement of climate change

4.1 In situ instrumental observations

4.2 Satellite measurements

4.3 Re-analysis work

4.4 Historical records

4.5 Proxy measurements

4.6 Dating

4.7 Isotope age dating

4.8 Summary

3

11-Apr

8 Prof. Lei Wang

Statistics, significance and cycles

5.1 Time series, sampling and harmonic analysis

5.2 Noise

5.3 Measures of variability and significance

5.4 Smoothing

5.5 Wavelet analysis

5.6 Multidimensional analysis

5.7 Summary 

3

18-Apr

9 Prof. Lei Wang

Consequences of climate change

9.1 Geological consequences

9.2 Flora and fauna

9.3 Mass extinctions

9.4 Sea levels, ice sheets and glaciers

9.5 Agriculture

9.6 The historical implications of climatic variability

9.7 Spread of diseases

9.8 The economic impact of extreme weather events

9.9 Summary

3

25-Apr

9” Prof. Lei Wang

climate change review 3

3

30-Apr

10 Prof. Yimin Liu

Modeling the climate

10.1 Context of climate modeling

10.2 Understanding climate change

10.3 Climate modeling and weather forecasting

10.4 Framework of climate models

10.5 Climate model development

3

2-May

11 Prof. Yimin Liu

Climate Modeling, Projection and Uncertainties

11.1 Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP)

11.2 Climate ensemble

11.3 Modeling historical climate change

11.4 Future climate projection

11.5 Modeling biases and uncertainties

11.6 Improving climate modeling over the TP

11.7 TP cold bias and Asian summer monsoon Simulation

3

9-May

12 Prof. Yimin Liu

Role of the modelling on scientific understanding I monsoon climatology

12.1 The concept of the monsoon thermal adaptation 

12.2 Thermal adaptation 

12.3 Impact of Land-sea distribution

12.4 Impact of Tibetan Plateau & Iranian Plateau

12.5 Thermal impacts or dynamic (isolation) impacts?

3

16-May

12” Prof. Yimin Liu

climate change review 4

3

21-May

13 Prof. Lei Wang

Hydrological modelling and its applications for integrated water resources management

3

23-May

14 Prof. Yimin Liu

Role of the modelling on scientific understanding II monsoon varibility

13.1 Byweekly oscillation of the South Asian Anticyclone

13.2 Impact of tropical cyclone on the seasonal evolution of the Asian summer monsoon

13.3 Decadal change of East Asian summer monsoon and the Tibetan Plateau impact

3

30-May

15 Prof. Baiqing Xu

Back carbon in the glacier area

3

6-Jun

16 Prof. Yaoming Ma

Land surface heat flux retrieve from in-situ data, remote sensing data and numerical model

3

13-Jun

4 Professors

climate change review 5

3

18-Jun

Total

 

64

 


 


 

Course title

Chemical Reaction Engineering

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. Li Chunshan, Prof. Xu Baohua, Associate Prof. Li Minjie

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

4 hrs/week: 3 hrs. lecture by Instructors, 1 hr. Offline Reading Course.

Course Assessment:

Homework: 6 assignments, will be given after each class, extensive literature reading is expected. 

Grading Policy:

Assignments 30%, Final 70%

Course Prerequisites:

College Chemistry, College Mathematics, English.

Catalog Description:

The course is mainly focusing on the essentials of kinetics, catalysis and chemical reactor engineering. The main issue of chemical reaction engineering is to analyze the physical chemistry of sub-processes in a reactor by a mathematical model method. Each process is expressed as an appropriate mathematical expression, thereby providing the analytical solution or numerical solution. Various typical reaction types and the proper reactor design theory will be introduced.

Schedule of the course 20´3



 
 

Section

Content

Hours

 

1

Introduction of Chemical Reaction Engineering

Concept of chemical reaction engineering

1

 

Chemical reaction engineering and safety

2

 

Chemical reaction engineering application

1

(Offline Course)

 

2

Homogeneous Reaction Kinetics 

Concentration-Dependent term of a rate equation

1

 

Temperature-Dependent term of a rate equation

2

 

Searching for a mechanism

(Offline Course)

 

Predictability of reaction rate from theory

2

 

3

The Kinetics of Gas-Solid Phase Catalysis

Introduction to catalysis

0.5

 

Comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

0.5

 

Catalysts composition

1

(Offline Course)

 

Catalyst deactivation and regeneration

1

 

Steps in gas-solids catalysis

2

 

Adsorption at the gas-solids interface

1.5

 

Adsorption modes

1.5

 

Process for establishing kinetic models

2

(Offline Course)

 

4

Macro-Kinetics of Gas-Solid Phase Catalysis

Transport and reaction at phase boundaries

1

 

The diffusion of gas in solid particles

1

 

The distribution of gas concentration and temperature in solid particles.

1

 

The correlation of the macroscopic reaction rate

1

(Offline Course)

 

5

Autoclave Type and Homogeneous Tubular Reactor

Types of ideal reactors

1.5  

 

Autoclave type reactor

1.5   

 

Homogeneous tubular reactor

1

(Offline Course)

 

6

Gas-Solid Phase Catalytic Reaction Fixed Bed Reactor

Main types of fixed bed catalytic reactor

1.5

 

Physical parameters of fixed bed reactor

1.5

 

Mass transfer and heat transfer in fixed bed reactor

1

(Offline Course)

 

7

Gas-Solid Phase Catalytic Reaction Fluidized Bed Reactor

Concept of fluidized bed reactor

1

 

Fluidization phenomenon

2

 

Geldart classification of solids

1

(Offline Course)

 

8

Gas-Liquid Reaction and Bubbling Reactor

Theory sketch

2

 

Mass transfer with irreversible and reversible reactions

2

 

9

The Gas-Liquid Reaction Process and the Reactor

Mass transfer theories

2

 

Key multiphase reactors

2

(Offline Course)

 

10

Liquid-Solid Reaction and Fluid Bed Reactor

liquid-solid reaction process

3

 

Application of fluidized bed reactor

1

(Offline Course)

 

11

Gas-Liquid-Solid Reaction Engineering

Types of gas-liquid-solid Reactors 

2

 

Macroscopic reaction kinetics

2

 

Application examples

2

 

Discussion and prospect

2

(Offline Course)

 

12

Safety of chemical reaction process and Design of reactor

General rules of safety

1

 

Examples of chemical reaction process safety

2

 

Reactor design

1

(Offline Course)

 

 

Textbook and any related course material:

 

1.    Reaction Engineering, 李绍芬,2019.01,化学工业出版社

2.    Multi-Phase Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology,金涌,2006.05,清华大学出版社

3.    Chemical Reaction Engineering, Octave Levenspiel, 1998.08, Wiley.

4.    Concepts of Modern Catalysis and Kinetics, Ib Chorkendorff, Hans Niemantsverdriet, 2003.10, Wiley.

5.    Fundamentals of chemical reaction engineering, Mark Davis and Robert Davis, 2003, McGraw-Hill (MHP)

 


 

 

Course title

Energy Chemistry and Energy Chemical Industry

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. Li, Songgeng, Associate prof, Fan, Chuigang 

Course type:

Lecture

Course Assessment:

Homework: 10 assignments

Grading Policy:

Assignments 40%, Final 40%, Attendance 20%

Course Prerequisites:

Familiar with the basic knowledge of Chemistry, Thermodynamics, and Flow and Transport Process. 

Catalog Description:

This course covers the fundamentals of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. The topics include coal utilization, petro chemistry, bio-energy, fuel cell, battery and some new energy resources like hydrogen, solar, etc. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, renewable resources and hydrogen over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Different forms of energy storage and transmission are also involved in this course. It is expected that after taking this course, students will be familiar with basic chemistry principles on energy processing, and most common energy processing technologies together with some environmental issues related. 

Schedule of the course

section

content

hours

1

Energy chemistry: a general review 

4

2

Coal conversion: part I : pyrolysis and gasification                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

4

3

Coal conversion: part II: liquefaction and combustion

4

4

Petroleum processing  

4

5

Processing technologies for natural gas and unconventional hydrocarbon resources 

4

6

Bioenergy: fundamentals and application I

4

7

Bioenergy: fundamentals and application II

4

8

Pollutants formation and control in energy conversions 

4

9

Solar energy: basic principles, direct utilization, photoelectric conversion, chemical conversion 

4

10

Hydrogen: features of hydrogen, storage tech. applications and relative technologies.

4

11

Fuel cell: overview, fundamentals, AFC, PEMFC, DMFC,SOFC, flow cell, others

4

12

Geothermal utilization

4

13

Wind energy and Ocean energy: 

4

14

Energy storage technologies I : Batteries

4

15

Energy storage technologies II: Other technologies

4

Total

 

60


Textbook and any related course material:

Ripudaman Malhotra, Fossil Energy, Springer, 2013,

Handbook of Alternative Fuel Technologies, CRC Taylor & Francis, 2015

Giafranco Pistoia, Battery Operated Devices and SystemsElsevier, 2009
 

Course title

Green Chemistry and Engineering

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. Zhang, Guangjin, 

Course type:

Lecture

Course Assessment:

Homework: 14 assignments, presentations

Grading Policy:

Assignments literature report 40%, Final Report 40%, Attendance 20%

Course Prerequisites:

Familiar with the basic knowledge of Chemistry, Thermodynamics. 

Catalog Description:

The purpose of this course includes: Increase the interest to Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, extend scope of knowledge, make the idea of “Green” into mind. Knowing the basic knowledge of green chemistry and engineering, the definition, developments, theory and some examples; Getting the ideas on how to develop a green process and can applied the learned knowledge in your further research works. The topics include basic principles of green chemistry, task of green chemistry, Catalysis and Green Chemistry. Biocatalysis, Photo/electrical Catalysis, Solid catalyst, Acid and base, Ionic liquid and other non-organic solvents, Chemical separation, Alternate Energy sources, New synthetic route, Functional materials,  Design of safe and harmless chemicals. 

 

Schedule of the course

section

content

Hours

 

1

Green Chemistry: a general review 

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

2

Task of green chemistry                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

3

Green chemistry and catalysis

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

4

biocatalysis  

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

5

Photo-catalysis 

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

6

Electro-catalysis 

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

7

Solid catalyst, Acid and Base

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

8

Ionic liquid and other non-organic solvents

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

9

Chemical separation

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

10

Working without organic solvent

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

11

Agrochemicals

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

12

Sustainable materials

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

13

Design of safe and harmless chemicals

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

14

chemistry of long wear

Class teaching 3h+literature reporting 1h

15

examination

4

Total

 

60


Textbook and any related course material:

Mukesh Doble, Green Chemistry and Processes,elsevier, 2009,

Albert Matlack, Introduction to Green Chemistry, CRC Press, 2012

 


 

 

Course title

Fluidization and Multiphase Flow

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. WANG Wei

Course type:

Lecture

Course Assessment:

Homework: 2 home exercises are to be solved individually. 2 course assignments are to be solved in groups of 2-3 students and extensive literature reading is expected. 

Grading Policy:

Assignments 40%, Final 40%, Attendance 20%

Course Prerequisites:

Principle of Chemical Engineering

Catalog Description:

This course will provide comprehensive knowledge of fluidization and multiphase flow with fundamentals and applications related to chemical engineering and energy conversion. A student who has met the objectives of the course will be able to: 

  1. Understand the flow regime of gas-solid flow and state of the art of research and application
  2. Manage basic calculations and solve practical problems related to fluidization
  3. Overview the modeling approached
  4. Design a fluidized bed reactor with preliminary requirement

Schedule of the course

section

content

hours

1

Fluidization phenomena and history, multiphase flow-history and development, class exercise

4

2

particle characterization, Single particle motion, 

4

3

flow regime diagram, criteria of transition, particulate and aggregative fluidization, stability analysis, class exercise

4

4

Bubbling fluidization, bubble dynamics, 

4

5

distributor design, entrainment and elutriation

6

6

Scale-up and scale-down of fluidized bed

4

7

Circulating fluidized bed, generalized fluidization, choking phenomena 

6

8

cyclone and separation, downer, mixing, mass and heat transfer

6

9

Particle-fluid mass transfer and heat transfer, wall-to-bed heat transfer

4

10

Introduction to multiphase fluid dynamics, two-fluid model,

 

6

11

Introduction to kinetic theory, drag force, multiscale models

6

12

Introduction to simplified solution, bubbling simulation, clustering simulation, reactive simulation, perspective

4

13

Final test

2

total

 

60


Textbook and any related course material:

The textbook mainly refers to:

Kunii, D., Levenspiel, O. Fluidization Engineering. Butterworth-Heinemann.1991.

Electronic course reading materials will be provided before each class. The following references are recommended, including:

Grace, J. et al. Fluidized Beds. Multiphase Flow Handbook. Taylor & Francis. 2006.

Gidaspow, D. Multiphase Flow and Fluidization, Academic Press, 1994.
 

Course title

Applied Statistics

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Assoc. Prof. Qian WANG Email: wangqian@ucas.ac.cn

Course type:

Lecture

Grading Policy:

Participation+in-class quiz (30%), Homework (40%), Project (30%)

Catalog Description:

This course is an introduction to applied statistics and data analysis. Topics are chosen from descriptive measures, sampling and sampling distribution, estimation and confidence interval, hypothesis test, linear regression, ANOVA, goodness-of-fit and contingency analysis. Data analysis is difficult without some computing tools and the course will introduce some statistical computing with Excel.

Schedule of the course

Section

Contents

  1. Introduction

 

What is statistics? 

Process of statistical study

Key definitions

Data types

  1. Data Collection

 

Data sources: Primary/Secondary

Survey/Observation/Experiment

Issues in data collection

Sampling techniques: Probability/Nonprobability

Sampling errors

  1. Descriptive Statistics

Graphical presentation of data: Categorical/Numerical

Measures of data: Center/Variation/Shape

Covariance & correlation coefficient

  1. Estimation

 

Introduction of statistical inference

Sampling distribution

Point estimation

Confidence intervals: one population/two populations

Determine sample size

  1. Hypothesis Testing

 

Introduction

Null Hypothesis and Alternative Hypothesis

Type I Error and Type II Error

Test on one populations

Test on two populations

  1. Linear Regression

 

Relationships between variables and regression

Simple linear regression

Residual analysis

Multiple linear regression: Collinearity

Model building: Nonlinear/Categorical variables/Variable selection

Common Mistakes in Regression

Logistic regression

  1. Goodness of fit

 

Chi-square test of proportion for Multinomial Experiment

Chi-square test of independence

Chi-square test of distribution

  1. ANOVA

 

Introduction

One-way ANOVA

Randomized Blocks ANOVA

Two-way ANOVA

 

Textbook and any related course material:

  1. Ajit C. Tamhane and Dorothy D. Dunlop. Statistics and Data Analysis: From Elementary to Intermediate. Prentice Hall, 2000. 
  2. Pawel Lewicki and Thomas Hill. Statistics: Methods and Applications. Springer, 2006. 
  3. Roxy Peck. Statistics: Learning from Data. Cengage Learning, 2017.

 

 

 


 

 

Course title

Applications of Remote Sensing on Climate Change, Land Science and Severe Weather

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. QI Youcun & Associate Prof. CAO Jie & Prof. DONG Jinwei 

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

8hrs/week by instructor. 

Course Assessment:

Homework: 4 assignments

Grading Policy:

Typically 20% Attendance, 40% homework, 20% Oral Presentation, 20% final.

Course Prerequisites:

Remote Sensing, Climate Change, Land Science

Catalog Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals, commonly used methods, and applications of remote sensing, and emphasizes the use of remote sensing data for studying climate changeland use change and  severe weather forecasting. Climate change and land use change are the most important components of global change studies. This course would provide a comprehensive examination of land use change in the context of global environmental change, together with a practical guide for interpreting satellite imagery in severe weather situationsWe will first learn the basics of remote sensing and fundamentals essential for understanding severe weather following by the remote sensing data analyses methods. Then these knowledge and tools will be used to understand the climate and land use changes as well as to improve severe weather forecasting at regional, national, and global scales. We will better understand the global change issues by examining socioeconomic drivers and physical and biological impacts of land use change and climate change. 

Schedule of the course

 

section

content

hours

Instructor

1

Course Introduction, Introductory Lecture 

Concepts, principle

4

Youcun Qi

2

Basic of Remote Sensing 

Major Sensors for monitoring climate change

Major Sensors for monitoring land use change

Major Sensors for monitoring severe weather

8

Youcun Qi

Jie Cao

3

Basic of Remote Sensing 

Fundamentals in Satellite imagery and severe weather, Basic information of radiances measured by satellites and its relationship with atmospheric dynamics 

4

Jie Cao

4

Methods of data processing and analyses

Remote sensing data processing

Data visualization

4

Youcun Qi

5

Methods of data processing and analyses

Land classification methods

Machine learning, etc.

4

Jinwei Dong

6

Methods of data processing and analyses

Interpreting satellite water vapor imagery

Severe weather analyses

4

Jie Cao

7

Student presentation on applications of RS

4

Youcun Qi

 

8

Remote Sensing of Climate Change

Generating the remote sensing data

Rainfall detection, Snow coverage and depth detection

Existing climate data and the applications

Data collection and Accuracy Assessment

4

Youcun Qi

9

Remote Sensing of Climate Change

Rainfall types and changes,

Snow coverage and depth monitoring 

4

Youcun Qi

10

Remote Sensing of Land use change

Existing land use maps and the applications

Land use mapping and change detection

Field Data Collection (Google Earth, Field Photos, and Visual Interpretation of images). 

Agricultural land use change

Forest changes monitoring

4

Jinwei Dong

11

Remote Sensing of Severe weather

Water vapor imagery analysis of main ingredients of severe weather situations

4

Jie Cao

12

Remote Sensing of Severe weather

Use of water vapor imagery for assessing numerical climate prediction model behavior and improving forecasts

4

Jie Cao

13

Presentation of the Final project

4

Youcun Qi

Jie Cao

14

Office hour

Final Exam

2

2

Youcun Qi

total

 

60

 


 

Contents of the course

Section 1: Basic of Remote Sensing

  1. Electromagnetic Radiation Principles
  2. Elements of Visual Image Interpretation
  3. Multispectral Remote Sensing Systems
  4. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Systems
  5. Thermal Remote Sensing Systems
  6. Active and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing
  7. Basic of Remote Sensing for climate change
  8. Major Sensors for monitoring climate change
  9. Basic of Remote Sensing for land use change
  10. Major Sensors for monitoring land use change 
  11. Fundamentals in Satellite imagery 
  12. Basic of satellite imagery in analyzing and predicting severe weather

Section 2: Methods of data processing and analyses

  1. Methods of data processing and analyses
  2. Data processing
  3. Data visualization
  4. Land classification methods
  5. Machine learning, etc.
  6. Interpreting satellite water vapor imagery
  7. Severe weather analyses

Section 3: Remote Sensing of Climate Change

  1. Generating the remote sensing data
  2. Existing climate data and the applications
  3. Data collection (Satellite, GPM, DPR)
  4. Accuracy Assessment
  5. Rainfall types and changes
  6. Snow coverage and depth monitoring

Section 4: Remote Sensing of Land Use Change

  1. Existing land use maps and the applications
  2. Field Data Collection (Google Earth, Field Photos, and Visual Interpretation of images)
  3. Land use mapping and change detection
  4. Accuracy Assessment
  5. Agricultural land use change
  6. Forest changes monitoring

Section 5: Remote Sensing of Severe Weather

  1. Interpretation of light and dark imagery features in satellite water vapor imagery 
  2. Potential vorticity thinking in severe weather
  3. Operational use of the relationship between potential vorticity fields and water vapor imagery 
  4. Water vapor imagery analysis of main ingredients of severe weather situations
  5. Use of water vapor imagery for assessing numerical climate prediction model behavior and improving forecasts

 

Textbook and any related course material:

1, John R. Jenson, 2007, Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective 

 

2, Christo G. Georgiev, Patrick Santurette, and Karine Maynard, 2016, Weather Analysis and Forecasting: Applying Satellite Water Vapor Imagery and Potential Vorticity Analysis, Second Edition 

 

3, Five journal papers will be assigned for student’s individual research project. 

Students can find these papers from the list we provide or through the Web of Science. 

 

Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:

Prior to taking this course, students need to have basic GIS and imagery process skills, the final project will require quantitative problem solving skills and might entail working with small datasets. 


 

 

Course title

Water Chemistry

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Asso. Prof. Huiyu DONG, Prof. Chao LIU, & Asso. Prof. Mengkai LI

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

6hrs/week by instructor

Course Assessment:

Homework: 5 assignments

Grading Policy:

Typically 25% homework, 25% presentation, 50% final.

Course Prerequisites:

General Chemistry, Physical Chemistry 

Catalog Description:

Water Chemistry is a core course in the Environmental Science and Engineering program. It provides a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of water chemistry to our incoming cohorts of students. This course details the quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. It includes a brief review of chemical thermodynamics that is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants.

Schedule of the course

Section

Content

Hours

1

Introduction

3

2

Part 1: Review of Thermodynamics, and Setting Up and Solving Equilibrium Problems

12

3

Part 2: Acid-base Chemistry of Natural Waters

9

4

Part 3: Dissolution, Precipitation, and Complexation

9

5

Part 4: Redox Chemistry

12

6

Part 5: Chemical Kinetics

12

7

Presentation

3

Total

 

60


 

Contents of the course

Part 1: Review of Thermodynamics, and Setting Up and Solving Equilibrium Problems

  1. Introduction, Review of Laws of Thermodynamics
  2. Gibbs Free Energy, Chemical Potential, eq. Constants
  3. Setting Up Equilibrium Problems - Tableau Method Molecular beam epitaxy
  4. Solving Problems by Approximation - Log C vs. pH Diagrams 
  5. Temperature, Pressure, and Ionic Strength Effects on Equilibrium
  6. Properties of Water, Interactions Among Solutes, Activity Coefficients
  7. Activity Coefficients and Debye-Huckel Theory

Part 2: Acid-base Chemistry of Natural Waters

  1. The Carbonate System and Alkalinity
  2. Uses and Limitations of Alkalinity
  3. Buffer Capacity

Part 3: Dissolution, Precipitation, and Complexation

  1. Mineral Solubility
  2. Stability Diagrams
  3. Chemical Weathering and Natural Water Composition
  4. Trace Metals - Inorganic Complexation

Part 4: Redox Chemistry

  1. Equilibrium Calculations with Redox Reactions
  2. Redox Potential (pe) as a System Variable
  3. pe-pH Diagrams
  4. Trace Metals - Organic Complexation
  5. Effects of Complexation and Precipitation on Redox Equilibria

Part 5: Chemical Kinetics

  1. Oxidation Kinetics in Homogeneous Systems
  2. Heterogeneous Systems
  3. Enzyme Catalysis
  4. Photochemical Process

Textbook and any related course material:

Mark Benjamin, Water Chemistry, Second Edition

Stumm, Werner, and James J. Morgan. Aquatic Chemistry. New York, NY: Wiley-Interscience, 1996. ISBN: 0471511854.

Anderson, G. W. Thermodyanmics of Natural Systems. New York, NY: Wiley-Interscience, 2005. ISBN: 0521847729.

Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:

Mathematics: strong

Chemistry: strong


 

 

Course title

Fundamental for Internet of Things and Its Applications 

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. Weidong Yi

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

3hrs/week by instructor. 1 hr/week by teaching assistant.

Course Assessment:

Homework: 6 assignments

Grading Policy:

Typically 30% homework, 40% final exam, 30% final project

Course Prerequisites:

None

Catalog Description:

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of internet of things (IoT)and a survey of its applications at different areas. The course is broken into four parts. In Part One, Introduction, which provides an overview of IoT applications, sensor nodes, and basic system structure,different node architectures and discusses in detail the sensing and processing subsystems as well as communication interfaces. Part Two, Basic Architectural Framework, which provides a detailed discussion of protocols and algorithms used at different network protocol layers in sensor systems. Part Three, Node and Network Management, which discusses several additional techniques and presents solutions for a variety of challenges, including power management techniques, concept of time synchronization and an overview of several synchronization strategies, a variety of localization strategies and compares their trade-offs. Security challenges and defenses against attacks on sensor networks of IoT are discussed in the part. Part Four, Applications, which provides cases study for applications in IoT, including applications for environmental monitoring , structure health monitoring, traffic control, precision agriculture, smart city , smart health-care etc.

Schedule of the course

section

content

hours

1

Motivation for an Internet of Things 

8

2

Node Architecture of IoT

8

3

Operating System for IoT

8

4

Physical Layer

4

5

 Medium Access Control

4

6

 Network Layer

4

7

Power Management

4

8

Time Synchronization

4

9

Localization

4

10

Security

4

11

Applications

4

12

Student presentation

2

13

Final Exam

2

total

 

60


 

Contents of the course

  1. Motivation for an Internet of Things 
    1. Definitions and Background
    2. Challenges and Constrains
  2. Node Architecture of IoT
    1. The Sensing Subsystem
    2. The Processor Subsystem
    3. Communication Interfaces
    4. Prototypes
  3. Operating System for IoT
    1. Functional Aspects
    2. Nonfunctional Aspects
    3. Prototypes
  4. Physical Layer
    1. Basic Components
    2. Source Encoding
    3. Channel Encoding
    4. Modulation
  5.  Medium Access Control
    1. Wireless MAC protocols
    2. Characteristics of MAC Protocols in Sensor Network of IoT
    3. Contention-Free MAC Protocols
    4. Contention-Based MAC Protocols
    5. Hybrid MAC Protocols
  6.  Network Layer
    1. Routing Metrics
    2. Flooding and Gossiping
    3. Data-Centric Routing
    4. On-Demand Routing
  7. Power Management
    1. Local Power Management Aspects
    2. Dynamic Power Management
    3. Conceptual Architecture
  8. Time Synchronization
    1. Basic of Time Synchronization
    2. Time Synchronization Protocols
  9.  Localization
    1. Ranging techniques
    2. Range-Based Localization
    3. Rang-Free Localization
    4. Event-Driven Localization
  10.  Security
    1. Fundamentals of Networks Security
    2. Security Attacks in IoT
    3. Protocols and Mechanisms for Security
  11. Applications

 

Textbook and any related course material:

  1. Waltenegus Dargie and Christian Poellabauer, Fundamentals of Wireless Sensor Networks, 2010, John Wiley& Sons Ltd
  2. Course Reader (Selected Reference Papers)

 

Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:

None


 

 

Course title:

Biodiversity science

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. MA Keping

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

4hrs/week by instructor

Course Assessment:

Homework: 10 assignments

Grading Policy:

Typically 40% homework, 60% final.

Course Prerequisites:

Ecology, General biology, Biogeography 

Catalog Description:

This course includes 14 sections: 

  1. Introduction 
    1. history of biodiversity science, conservation ecology and conservation biology
    2. hot topics for biodiversity science
  2. Biodiversity status and conservation strategies
  3. Biodiversity distribution pattern and associated environmental factors 
  4. Species distribution model and its applications
  5. Biodiversity maintenance mechanisms
  6. Biodiversity and ecosystem function and services
  7. Biodiversity monitoring and community assembly
  8. Biodiversity informatics and big data science
  9. Indicators and surrogates for biodiversity
  10. Climate and biodiversity
  11. Biodiversity mapping and conservation priority areas
  12. Biodiversity hotspots and conservation planning
  13. On site and off site conservation
  14. Global efforts in biodiversity conservation

Schedule of the course

section

content

hours

1

Introduction 

  1. history of biodiversity science, conservation ecology and conservation biology
  2. hot topics for biodiversity science

3

2

Biodiversity status and conservation strategies

3

3

Biodiversity distribution pattern and associated environmental factors

3

4

Species distribution model and its applications

4

5

Biodiversity maintenance mechanisms

4

6

Biodiversity and ecosystem function and services

4

7

Biodiversity monitoring and community assembly

4

8

Biodiversity informatics and big data science/ Student presentation

4

9

Biodiversity mapping and conservation priority areas

4

10

Indicators and surrogates for biodiversity

4

11

Climate and biodiversity

4

12

Biodiversity hotspots and conservation planning/ On site and off site conservation

4

13

Global efforts in biodiversity conservation/ Student presentation

4

14

Final exam

3

total

 

52


 

Contents of the course

1 Introduction 

  1. History of biodiversity science, conservation ecology and conservation biology
  2. Hot topics for biodiversity science
  3. Global significance of biodiversity research in China
  4. Introduction of journals related to biodiversity science

2 Biodiversity status and conservation strategies

  1. What is biodiversity
  2. Status of biodiversity
  3. Vegetation geographical distribution
  4. Endemism of biodiversity
  5. Threats to biodiversity
  6. Assessment of threatened status of biodiversity
  7. Conservation progress

3 Biodiversity distribution pattern and associated environmental factors 

  1. Brief history and current knowledge about geographical patterns in biodiversity
  2. Ecological hypotheses explaining biodiversity patterns 
  3. Evolutionary hypotheses explaining biodiversity patterns 
  4. Stochastic processes on biodiversity patterns
  5. Effects of spatial scales on biodiversity patterns
  6. Exercise: the estimation of biodiversity patterns

4 Species distribution models and its applications 

  1. Determinants of species distributions
  2. How species distribution models work?
  3. Validation of species distribution models
  4. Assumptions of species distribution models
  5. Uncertainties in the calibration of species distribution models
  6. Application of species distribution models

5 Biodiversity maintenance mechanisms 

  1. Deterministic processes, including competitive exclusion, environmental filtering, Janzen-Connell hypothesis, and species pool hypothesis
  2. Stochastic processes, including neutral theory, dispersal limitation
  3. Methods for the test of different hypotheses
  4. Exercise: Using null models to test the mechanisms of species assembly 

6 Biodiversity and ecosystem function and services 

  1. Brief history of the topic
  2. Major concepts in studies on biodiversity and ecosystem function and services
  3. Relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem function and services
  4. Mechanisms of biodiversity effects
  5. Methods for the testing of biodiversity effects
  6. Major biodiversity experiments

7 Biodiversity monitoring and community assembly

  1. Brief history of the topic
  2. Major initiatives for biodiversity monitoring
  3. Biodiversity monitoring in China
  4. Species coexistence and Community assembly rules

8. Biodiversity informatics and big data science

  1. Brief history of the topic
  2. Major initiatives for biodiversity informatics
  3. Biodiversity informatics in China
  4. Big biodiversity data resources 
  5. Mapping data based research

9. Indicators and surrogates for biodiversity

  1.  Surrogates, umbrellas and keystones
  2.  Indicators for biodiversity loss
  3.  Tradeoffs between different priorities and species
  4.  Holistic indicators of biodiversity

10. Climate and biodiversity

  1. Species ecophysiology and environment
  2. Migratory species and changing needs
  3. Climate change-what does it mean on a species level
  4. Phenology, asynchrony, mis-matches and novel communities
  5. Microclimate and different forms of adaptation

11. Biodiversity mapping and conservation priority areas

  1. Metrics in biodiversity
  2. Scale and types of resolution in biodiversity and what they mean
  3. Rarity, threat, choosing units for biodiversity analysis and the implications
  4. Mapping biodiversity threats
  5. Understanding biodiversity data, assumptions of analysis, types of data
  6. Biodiversity models, types and applications
  7. Homework: Redlist of ecosystems assessment

12. Biodiversity hotspots and conservation planning

  1. Asking questions with biodiversity data
  2. Understanding assumptions in biodiversity analyses
  3. Mapping hotspots
  4. Tradeoffs in prioritization approaches
  5. Approaches for developing priorities
  6. Landscape scale conservation planning and tools available
  7. Homework: Continue and finish redlisting ecosystem

13. On site and off site conservation

  1. Discussion of redlist of ecosystems, how do priorities compare, is the data there
  2. Species vs ecosystem approaches to conservation
  3. Translocation, breeding
  4. Weighing approaches and case-studies in different approaches to conservation and their uses: how to balance priorities and costs
  5. Homework: Each student will be assigned a species to develop conservation plans for under different circumstances

14. Global efforts in biodiversity conservation

  1. Discuss case-studies, include real examples of where these approaches have been used, explore tradeoffs between different approaches, discuss success
  2. Conservation at different scales
  3. Conservation targets
  4. International bodies and conservation, CBD and other multilateral agreements

 

Textbook and any related course material:

Navjot S. Sodhi and Paul R. Ehrlich. 2010. Conservation Biology for All. Oxford University Press;

Richard J. Ladle and Robert J. Whittaker. 2011.Conservation Biogeography. Wiley-Blackwell

Richard Primack. 2014. Essentials of Conservation Biology. Sinauer Associates

Mark V. LomolinoBrett R. RiddleRobert J. WhittakerJames H. Brown. 2010. Biogeography. Oxford University Press

Fred Van Dyke. 2020. Conservation Biology: Foundations, Concepts, Applications. Springer

 

Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:

General biology: moderate

Ecology: moderate

Biogeography: moderate 

 

Course title

Development Geography

Instructor(s)-in-charge:

Prof. DENG Xiangzheng & Prof. DONG Jinwei & Associate Prof. SONG Wei & Associate Prof. WU Feng

Course type:

Lecture

Course Schedule:

3hrs/week by instructor

Course Assessment:

Homework: 4 assignmentsstudent presentation 

Grading Policy:

Typically 30% homework, 30% student presentation, 40% final.

Course Prerequisites:

NULL

Catalog Description:

Development geography is a subdiscipline of geography that studies human development and quality of life. Based on geography, development geography integrates disciplines such as management, economics, ecology, etc., and has the characteristics of integrity and interdisciplinary. Development Geography facilitates a more integrated understanding of development and places development problems within the context of the global economy and society. Its topics cover the concepts, theories and approaches, and development trend etc., which ranges from population and culture to agricultural and industrial development. Specifically, the contents of the courses include the concepts and progress of development geography, overview of geographical development differences; and specific analysis of geographical distribution and differences in income inequality and poverty, population, education and health, culture, resource and environment carrying capacity, rural and agricultural development, urban and industrial development, and the regional differences of globalization and international and regional development, etc. Further, case studies will be presented to highlight the possible solutions, as well as the problems, at local, national and international levels. 

 

Schedule of the course

Section

Content

Hours

1

Concepts and progress of development geography

3

2

Overview of development geography

3

3

Overview of geographical differences in regional development geography

6

4

Income inequality and poverty

3

5

Geographical distribution of population in China

3

6

Land use policy and management in China

3

7

Agriculture and food security in China

3

8

Student presentation and discussions

3

9

Resource and environmental carrying capacity and regional differences

6

10

Geographic development differences in rural areas and agriculture

3

11

Geographic development differences in cities and industry

3

12

Student presentation and discussions

3

13

Review on globalization and regionalization development

3

14

International trade, cooperation and regional development

3

15

The balance of payments, financial stability and regional development

3

16

The national cases: China, Brazil and India

3

17

Student presentation and discussions

3

18